Expert Advice

  1. Recipe: Mince pies with three-grain shortcrust

    Recipe: Mince pies with three-grain shortcrust BakeryBits is known the world over for making it easy to buy and enjoy excellent and unusual stoneground flours, heritage grains, as well as the finest roller-milled flours used by the best artisan bakers. So, we thought that this year our mince pies should continue that celebration and combine stone-milled flour – from one of our many great millers we stock, or out of your own Mockmill – with the finest white flour to produce what we think ... Read more...
  2. Which Yeast is Which?

    Which Yeast is Which? You'll find a number of different yeasts available at BakeryBits. Which one should you choose, how are they different from each other, and how should they be used? Some yeasts are general purpose, while others are selected and cultivated for a particular job - raising an enriched dough such as hot cross bun, panettone, for example, or to allow an industrial bakery to introduce yeast at a specific point in their processes. The result is that a ... Read more...
  3. How To: Make a Sekowa Baking Ferment Starter

    How To: Make a Sekowa Baking Ferment Starter Sekowa Baking Ferment can be used to make a batch of starter which will keep in your fridge for a couple of months, to be used up as you make bread. This is how you go about it.Stage 1 Using a large (2-3 litre) bowl, add the Sekowa Special Baking Ferment granules to the water and stir, ensuring there are no lumps. Mix in the wholemeal and white flour to form a slack dough using your trusty dough whisk! Cover well (clingfilm) and leave ... Read more...
  4. How to: Your Guide to Baking With Bannetons

    How to: Your Guide to Baking With Bannetons Your transition from hobbyist to baking maestro... The rite of passage that signifies the change from happy home baker to budding artisan bread maestro begins perhaps at the moment you start to unwrap the banneton that you finally decided you had to order from BakeryBits. This is the day you start to craft the shape and crust of your bread more finely, and from that point onwards, your baking will never be the same again. Especially on those ... Read more...
  5. What is: Dark Rye, Light Rye, White Rye, Wholemeal Rye... and just plain Rye

    What is: Dark Rye, Light Rye, White Rye, Wholemeal Rye... and just plain Rye We're sometimes asked questions about rye flour, for example "what's the difference between dark rye and light rye?", and "is all rye flour wholemeal?". Hopefully we can quickly clear up any confusion you might have about rye flour and how it's sometimes labelled. Thanks to Andrew Wilkinson of Gilchester, and baking guru Dan Lepard for their input. Like wheat flours, rye can be classified by how much of the bran and germ of the grain remains ... Read more...
  6. What is: Emmer Flour?

    What is: Emmer Flour? Emmer (Triticum dicoccum) is an 'ancient grain', native to parts of the Near East, where it formed part of the diet of hunter gatherers before becoming domesticated by 7000BCE. It arose as a hybrid between a wild variety of einkorn and an annual goatgrass. It was cultivated in Britain by around 2000BCE, but almost universally it was eventually replaced by higher-yielding grain varieties, though it remains as a "relict crop" in mountainous areas ... Read more...
  7. How to: Bakers' Percentages and the MyWeigh KD8000 scales

    How to: Bakers' Percentages and the MyWeigh KD8000 scales We're all familiar with recipes that specify flour, water, starter etc in grams, ounces, cups or spoons. But what if you want to make the recipe a little - or a lot - larger? Doubling a recipe using mental arithmetic is usually easy enough, but can still lead to annoying mistakes (at least, in my experience!). However, increasing the original recipe by a more complicated amount, such as 3.75 times larger, is much more prone to error. Bakers ... Read more...
  8. How to: Sourdough Starters - How Do you Care For Yours?

    How to: Sourdough Starters - How Do you Care For Yours? Ask a dozen bakers how they look after their sourdough starter (or leaven), you'll probably get a baker's dozen replies. Everyone starts by avidly following guides to get started - Dan Lepard's method in his excellent The Handmade Loaf is how I started mine, several years ago now. After a little while, and probably with too much confidence and too little experience with a healthy touch of laziness, I wondered about just keeping the starter ... Read more...

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