Ingredients

  1. Which Yeast is Which?

    Which Yeast is Which? You'll find a number of different yeasts available at BakeryBits. Which one should you choose, how are they different from each other, and how should they be used? Some yeasts are general purpose, while others are selected and cultivated for a particular job - raising an enriched dough such as hot cross bun, panettone, for example, or to allow an industrial bakery to introduce yeast at a specific point in their processes. The result is that a ... Read more...
  2. Malt Teasers: tempting you with baking tips using malt powders, syrups & flours

     Malt Teasers: tempting you with baking tips using malt powders, syrups & flours Malt is one of those ingredients that we are familiar with but equally unsure of. Made from grains that have been soaked, left to sprout somewhere warm, then roasted at a low temperature and finally ground, the resulting sweet (almost caramel) powder is used to enhance the rise, crust and crumb colour of breads, and has been used for hundreds of years. The sweetness in malt comes from enzymes within the grain that can convert starches into ... Read more...
  3. What is: Dark Rye, Light Rye, White Rye, Wholemeal Rye... and just plain Rye

    What is: Dark Rye, Light Rye, White Rye, Wholemeal Rye... and just plain Rye We're sometimes asked questions about rye flour, for example "what's the difference between dark rye and light rye?", and "is all rye flour wholemeal?". Hopefully we can quickly clear up any confusion you might have about rye flour and how it's sometimes labelled. Thanks to Andrew Wilkinson of Gilchester, and baking guru Dan Lepard for their input. Like wheat flours, rye can be classified by how much of the bran and germ of the grain remains ... Read more...
  4. What is: Emmer Flour?

    What is: Emmer Flour? Emmer (Triticum dicoccum) is an 'ancient grain', native to parts of the Near East, where it formed part of the diet of hunter gatherers before becoming domesticated by 7000BCE. It arose as a hybrid between a wild variety of einkorn and an annual goatgrass. It was cultivated in Britain by around 2000BCE, but almost universally it was eventually replaced by higher-yielding grain varieties, though it remains as a "relict crop" in mountainous areas ... Read more...

4 Items

Show per page