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More about flour

  • Heritage flour is the latest thing

    One thing we’re often asked by customers is how to best use the Lammas Fayre heritage flours. Given the current interest in heritage grains, it’s not surprising and we’re keen to help out with ideas and recipes. Some bakers it seems, are a little nervous about using these flours. It is understandable that they are worried that ancient wheat varieties might be more challenging to work with and some customers have voiced concerns that this kind of flour may not give good results when used for modern recipes. I can honestly...

  • Sharpham Park's Story of Spelt

    One of the farms leading the resurgence in British spelt growing is Sharpham Park near Glastonbury in Somerset. Owner of Sharpham Park, Roger Saul, cheerfully explains how organic spelt is “dead in the water in terms of commercial farming”. The crop yields at best two tonnes per acre, compared to the four tonnes or more you can get from wheat, albeit with a hefty input of fertilizer. You then need to factor in crop rotation – spelt can be grown on the same land for a year or two, but then the soil fertility needs to be rebuilt by growing...

  • Spelt – an ancient grain for modern tastes

    Not long ago, spelt was an almost forgotten grain. Lower yielding and needing more post-harvest processing than conventional wheat, it had been left behind in the race to modernise. Over the past decade it has been ‘rediscovered’ as a nutritious alternative to wheat flour and spelt is now being embraced as a key ingredient for baking delicious bread. Spelt is a grain with a long history of cultivation. There’s archaeological evidence of it being grown by ancient societies in both the Middle East and Europe. Further evidence of the historical importance of spelt comes from ancient Greek and Roman...

  • Heritage Blend Wholemeal from Lammas Fayre

    One of my favourite flours to bake with is the Heritage Blend Wholemeal from Lammas Fayre.  It has bags of valour, with a malty, nutty sweetness to it. I often use about 20% of it in my usual everyday white bread to add texture and flavour. What is Heritage flour? Heritage flour is a somewhat controversial name for varieties of flour made from grain that lacks the characteristics required for industrial milling.  It is a controversial term because some millers consider that grains from the 1970’s are heritage, and some define heritage grains as those grown pre...

  • Mulino Marino “00” Soffiata - Flour of the Month

    April’s flour of the Month is Mulino Marino “00” Soffiata. 00 is the one flour that I would never be without.  It’s one of the best basic white flours a baker can have in the cupboard and I use it for everything, and I mean everything.  Bread, pizzas baguettes, brioche, croissants, muffins, cakes, pancakes and ciabatta with a 14 – 16% protein the 00 is a bakers essential and this one is as finely milled as it gets. Mulino Marino’s creamy white type 00 Soffiata flour is milled from organic wheat and is free of any enhancers or other...

  • Buck up your baking with some Buckwheat

    Buckwheat is really delectable nutty gluten-free (although may have been ground in a mill grinding wheat) flour that adds a wonderful depth of flavour and texture to most recipes. For some strange reason buckwheat seems to have fallen by the margins in the UK. It is even listed under the heading of “Miscellaneous Bread Flours” in Elizabeth David’s English Bread and Yeast Cookery (1977). In it she says “Although little is known nowadays in England, buckwheat was certainly grown to a small extent in the Midland counties in the eighteenth and nineteenth century.  The seed was used to feed pheasants...

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